You have probably heard Lyon County Judge-Executive Wade White use the phrase, “We’ve got to be wise, not paralyzed” in dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic. I believe this is certainly great advice and use of wisdom in leadership which not only pertains to the pandemic, but also to our relationship with God and one another.

These two are interrelated as are all things that go on in our lives. It just so happens that the Gospel reading for use in Catholic masses around the world for the day I am writing this, Friday, March 20, was Mark 12:28-34. A scribe asked Jesus, “Which is the first of all the commandments?” Jesus replied, “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, with all your soul, and with all your mind, and with all your strength. The second is this: You shall love your neighbor as yourself. There is no other commandment greater than these.”

With love for God and our neighbor — and we know how Jesus defined “neighbor” in Luke 10:29-37 — and even for those that distance themselves from God but still value caring for their neighbor, we know how we should act in our everyday lives, but especially during this pandemic.

God has given us the intelligence to understand COVID-19 and the wisdom of how to combat it. Use the best information available, CDC.gov, and not hearsay.

Take care of yourself and your family, but also check on your neighbors and ask if you can help them. And pray, pray, pray that we will hear God’s call to worship Him in caring for one another; that the hearts of those who might use this pandemic to take unjust advantage of vulnerable individuals will be softened to turn from that evil; to be wise, not paralyzed as we make decisions during this most stressful time.

Jesus said in Matthew 7:24-25, “Everyone who listens to these words of mine and acts on them will be like a wise man who built his house on rock. The rain fell, the floods came, and the winds blew and buffeted the house. But it did not collapse; it had been set solidly on rock.”

Amen.

Paul R. Bachi is a deacon at St. Mark Catholic Church in Eddyville. His opinions are his own and not necessarily those of this newspaper.

Paul R. Bachi is a deacon at St. Mark Catholic Church in Eddyville. His opinions are his own and not necessarily those of this newspaper.